Hope

PDS Esperança settlers have been largely forgotten by the Brazilian government, facing constant threat from illegal loggers; in Anapu, northern Brazil. REUTERS / Lunae Parracho

Brazilian couple Marcio Ribeiro and Natalha Almeida pose with their son Jeremias inside their home on what used to be the property of the rancher condemned to 30 years in jail for paying gunmen in 2005 to assassinate U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, inside the community named PDS Esperanca (“Hope” in Portuguese), a project in sustainable development considered one of the promising solutions for the development coupled with conservation in the amazon. PDS Esperança settlers have been largely forgotten  by the Brazilian government, facing constant threat from illegal loggers. June 6, 2012, in Anapu, western Pará state, northern Brazil. REUTERS / Lunae Parracho

With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country’s new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is easing the rules for those responsible for illegal forest felling. REUTERS / Lunae Parracho

A soldier from Brazil’s National Security Force patrols in the entrance to the community known as PDS Esperanca, a project in sustainable development founded by U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, who was murdered in Brazil in 2005, in Anapu.

Illegal logs found on May 2012 inside the PDS Esperança

A cross stands on the spot where U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, was murdered in 2005, inside the PDS Esperanca community, a project in sustainable development that Stang founded, in Anapu.

*** For more information (in portuguese): https://lunaeparracho.wordpress.com/2012/07/28/esperanca/

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